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    Welcome to St. Luke's Church Cannock.

    Welcome to St Luke’s Church, a place of worship which has been at the heart of life in Cannock for 900 years. Here you will find a beautiful building with a history of Christian life that has witnessed to the love of God through the ages.

    • Here you will find a vibrant faith community praising and worshipping God our Father, through faith in Jesus as Lord in the power of the Holy Spirit.
    • Here you will find a church of all ages committed to loving and serving God in one another and in our local community.
    • Here you will find a church which treasures its traditions but which is open to new ways of worship and to what God is doing in the present.
       

    ​Above all, you will find a welcoming and hospitable Christian community that will encourage you wherever you find yourself on your journey of faith.

    St Luke's is a Grade II* listed building.  It occupies a prime location at the heart of the Town Centre and is surrounded by well maintained grassed areas to the north and south with a good range of mature trees making a beautiful oasis in the middle of our busy town

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    Easter Hope

     

    The death and resurrection of Jesus is at the heart of the Christian faith.  On Good Friday the Churches of St Luke and St Thomas will remember the death of Jesus and will joyfully celebrate the resurrection on Easter Sunday.  Yes, I will say with the whole church that Jesus is risen, or to be more precise join the church in saying that the tomb was empty and that Jesus’ body was raised from the dead.  The bodily resurrection of Jesus is an important part of what I believe and at the heart of my faith.  It reveals that Jesus Christ not only conquered sin but also defeated death: that great source of fear and threat to human life.

    People have tried in all kinds of ways to explain away the empty tomb and the physical resurrection as it is recorded by those eye witnesses in the Bible.  Some have suggested that Jesus didn’t really die and was later simply resuscitated.  Others have suggested that Jesus did die but the disciples stole the body and made up the story of the resurrection.  However, the only thing that makes sense to me, the only thing that accounts for the birth of the early church and the courage of those first disciples, and of course the faith that gives me hope today, is an encounter with Jesus the crucified and Risen Lord.

    As a church our Lenten book this year is called “Learning to dream again”.  It’s a very evocative title for a book that encourages its readers to grow in faith, hope and love.  I suspect that if Christians and the Christian Church wish to reveal something of the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ then growing in faith, hope and love must be at the heart things.

    Though all three virtues are equally worthy of elaboration, I would suggest that we live at a time when hope is in short supply and yet very seriously needed.  Hope on a personal and relational level; hope on a national and international level, not least as we look to the Middle East and see factions at war tearing nations apart.

    However, the bodily resurrection of Jesus is why those who claim to be people of faith in Jesus Christ can also be people of hope.  For the resurrection of Jesus reveals that God takes all that we human beings are very seriously, not just what some people call our ‘souls’, as if there’s an entity within us that is somehow separate from our body, but all that we are as persons body, mind and spirit.  And it also suggests that the earth and all of God’s wonderful creation can also look forward in hope to a time when Jesus returns and all things will be renewed in him.  The last book of the Bible, the Revelation to St John, Speaks of ‘a new heaven and a new earth’ which means that nothing of God’s good creation will be lost or left behind: it too is part of God’s good plan and purpose.

    This means, I would suggest that Christians should not only be full of hope for the future but should be people who live life fully and responsibly in the present.  In other words, people who worship the Father through faith in Jesus the Son by enjoying the world that God has made.  But at the same time people that are prepared to care for the world and treat its resources with respect as well as caring for the poor, the sick, the lonely, the refugees of war and so on.  Bishop Tom Wright suggests ‘Precisely because the resurrection has happened as an event within our own world, its implications and effects are to be felt within our own world, here and now’.

    Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again.

    These are words of hope that the church will say on Easter Day. Why not join us at St Luke’s or St Thomas’ this Easter time.  Who knows you might encounter the Risen Lord and in him discover hope for the future and courage to live life to the full in the present.

     

    Every Blessing

     

    Peter

     

     

     

     

     

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